Adjustable Height Gantry Hoist

High and Low Position Rendering

SolidWorks Concept Rendering of the Adjustable Height Gantry Hoist

My friend Bill needed a hoist to lift equipment on and off his flatbed trailer …

( CLICK on the images to see a larger view of the SolidWorks renderings )

SolidWorks Rendering of the Hoist at the Uppermost Height

SolidWorks Rendering of the Hoist at the Uppermost Height

He needed it to go up to 12 1/2 feet  ( Measured from bottom of the i-beam )

Also Bill wanted to be able to store the hoist in a lower 8 foot position …

SolidWorks Rendering Showing the Hoist in its Lowest Position

SolidWorks Rendering Showing the Hoist in its Lowest Position

The most common height the hoist will be used at is about 9 feet …

SolidWorks Rendering Showing the Hoist in its Normal Position

SolidWorks Rendering Showing the Hoist in its Normal Position

There is a possibility the hoist may need to be taken to a job-site in the future, so when designing it in SolidWorks I made sure all the individual parts could easily be lifted in and out of a trailer by 2 workers.

SolidWorks CAD Software Screen-Capture Showing All the Hoist Parts

SolidWorks CAD Software Screen-Capture Showing All the Hoist Parts

The hoist sits on Threaded Levelers that are put down for support when doing any lifting; in addition, when not lifting items the threaded supports can be raised so that the hoist rests on the wheels and can be rolled around anywhere Bill needs it on his concrete pad.

After the wheels arrived I drew them into SolidWorks to check the fit-up …

Wheels used on the Hoist

Wheels used on the Hoist

Once all the designs were finished, Bill purchased the metal, and I drove it back in my Jeep so I could drive all the way inside the shop to unload the metal.

Unloading Metal from the Jeep

Unloading Metal from the Jeep

You can see in these photos why I won’t get rid of the ole’ 1999 Jeep because I can take out the seats and haul a lot of stuff in it.

Using the Little Lift Table to Help Remove Metal from the Jeep

Using the Little Lift Table to Help Remove Metal from the Jeep

Can get 90″ lengths of metal completely inside the Jeep, and if needed, longer items can hang out the back window … and on some occasions I will take off the top to have a full pickup like vehicle.

It’s not shown in these photos, but I was also able to get ALL of the 5″ square tubing into the Jeep because we had it pre-cut to length at the metal supplier

Lots of Room in the Jeep with the Front Passenger Seat Removed

Lots of Room in the Jeep with the Front Passenger Seat Removed

I like to view my Fabrication Drawings on an i-Pad when working in the shop, so took SolidWorks screen-captures of the parts I wished to work on each day to show me the dimensions for cutting & drilling, as-well-as welding fit-ups

Example of SolidWorks Dimensions for Viewing on the i-Pad During the Fabrication Process in the Shop

Example of SolidWorks Dimensions for Viewing on the i-Pad During the Fabrication Process in the Shop

There are MANY more bolt-on hole locations on the Hoist than are needed; however, it was designed this way so we may use some of the parts from this hoist on additional future projects such as a remote Drill Rig structure for drilling in Helical Piers & Micropiles for soil & foundation stabilization.

SolidWorks Screen-Capture Showing the Extra Bolt-On Locations

SolidWorks Screen-Capture Showing the Extra Bolt-On Locations

At the same time I was building the Hoist used left-over metal to design and build a set of Pallet Lifting Forks for use with the Hoist

SolidWorks Concept of the Pallet Lifting Forks made from Scrap Metal

Scrap Metal Engineering SolidWorks Concept for the Pallet Lifting Forks

Since I was using Left-Over metal I had to use the size & thickness available so came up with a method of adding some additional strength inside the Forks

Metal Parts for the Lifting Forks

Metal Parts for the Lifting Forks

I took some 1 inch threaded rod and welded 2 bolts to the rod at a specific length to match some holes in the Fork’s rectangular tubing …  Also drilled an extra hole in the mounting plate that the rectangular tubing was going to be welded … In the photo below I have the threaded rod sitting on top of the rectangular tubing as it fit inside and then was welded from the outside holes … I don’t have photos of the process but when all the welding was done I ground the outer welds smooth.

Showing How the Threaded Rod Fit Inside the Fork's Tubing

Showing How the Threaded Rod Fit Inside the Fork’s Tubing

By welding the rod to the nuts, and then the nuts to the rectangular tubing, it stiffened the rectangular tubing at a possible bend point on one end if lifting something very heavy from the other end of the forks.

In addition, the end of the threaded rod was welded inside a larger diameter hole in the mounting plate which was also welded to the rectangular tubing.

Another view of the Pallet Lifting Forks made from Left-Over Metal

Another view of the Pallet Lifting Forks made from Left-Over Metal

Once all the designs were finished, I started cutting metal to build the Hoist …

Cutting the Side Leg Support Brace on the Metal Band-Saw

Cutting the Side Leg Support Brace on the Metal Band-Saw

After cutting the metal, I started drilling holes with a Magnetic Drill Press …

Using the DeWalt MagDrill to Drill Holes in 5" Square Tubing

Using the DeWalt MagDrill to Drill Holes in 5″ Square Tubing

The new DeWalt MagDrill & Annular Bits cut through the steel like butter!!

DeWalt DWE1622K Magnetic Drill Press

DeWalt DWE1622K Magnetic Drill Press

I chose the DeWalt MagDrill because it has a Quick-Connect feature which allows the user to quickly switch between different diameter Annular Cutters and/or attach the included normal Drill Chuck for smaller bits

Example of a Metal Cutting Annular Drill Bit Used with MagDrills

Example of a Metal Cutting Annular Drill Bit Used with MagDrills

Drilling Holes in the 5" Square Tubing

Drilling Holes in the 5″ Square Tubing

Using the Little Lift Table to Support the Long Square Tubing on the Welding Table

Using the Little Lift Table to Support the Long Square Tubing on the Welding Table

Once the holes in the 5″ Square Tubing were drilled I cut lengths of pipe to fit into the holes … Used different diameter pipe to match with the size of bolts that would be going through the inside diameter of the pipe

Nominal Pipe Size 1″ has O.D. 1.32″ and I.D. 1.05″
( Use this for 1″ Bolts )

Nominal Pipe Size 3/4″ has O.D. 1.05″ and I.D. 0.82″
( Use this for 3/4″ Bolts )

Used the Lathe to bevel the ends of the pipe to allow more weld penetration so the welds could be ground off smooth leaving just a hole in the Square tubing with the welded pipe inside so water can not get inside the tubing once painted.

Pipe Lengths Cut for Inner Tubing for All Holes

Pipe Lengths Cut for Inner Tubing for All Holes

This is something we had to do years ago when working on ships … any holes had to have a pipe welded inside, thus sealing up the inside of the Structural tubing or pipe from the weather.

Pipe Aligned Inside the Square Tubing Ready to be Welded

Pipe Aligned Inside the Square Tubing Ready to be Welded

Used Welding Magnets to Hold the Pipe in Place

Used Welding Magnets to Hold the Pipe in Place

View from Below Showing How the Magnets Hold the Pipe from Falling Through

View from Below Showing How the Magnets Hold the Pipe from Falling Through

Also Welded Pipe in the Leg's Tubing

Also Welded Pipe in the Leg’s Tubing

Sometimes when I am TIG Welding the metal gets too hot for normal gloves, so I  use a ‘TIG FINGER’ to keep comfortable – Click on the Image below to get more info about the TIG Finger.

TIG Finger for Welding on Hot Metal

TIG Finger for Welding on Hot Metal

Welded together the Center Supports using Miller Multimatic™ 200 …

MIG, TIG, and STICK Weld with this Inverter Welding Machine

MIG, TIG, and STICK Weld with this Inverter Welding Machine

Welded Center Hoist Support Units

Welded Center Hoist Support Units

Some of the Leg holes I waited to drill until I had the Center Supports finished …

Welded Numbers on the Legs and Center Supports

Welded Numbers on the Legs and Center Supports

I have a VERY small shop area and this project was much larger than my welding area … Therefore, while I would have liked to have felt any leg would fit on any other leg’s mounting location, due to my limited shop and welding table size, I could not make a welding jig on my table so I decide to do one leg at a time and weld numbers on the leg to match the location I knew would fit on the center supports … Ya know  *GRIN*  Just in case there were any welding discrepancies.

Doing a Test Fit of the Legs and Center Supports

Doing a Test Fit of the Legs and Center Supports

As it turned out all the legs fit in the other mounting locations …  Got Lucky!

Making Sure All the Parts Fit Together Prior to Painting

Making Sure All the Parts Fit Together Prior to Painting

When all the welding was finished I bolted together both of the Side Stanchions on the floor as one last test fit-up prior to priming & painting all the parts …

Making Sure the Wheels Bolt on Correctly Before Painting the Metal

Making Sure the Wheels Bolt on Correctly Before Painting the Metal

To save space I drilled and tapped 2 of the holes for mounting the wheels …

Putting on White Primer Paint on the Center Supports

Putting on White Primer Paint on the Center Supports

Painting Primer on the Hoist Legs

Painting Primer on the Hoist Legs

Some of the parts I painted White and others Gray …

Using Every Spare Space in My Shop to Paint Items

Using Every Spare Space in My Shop to Paint Items

To put together the Hoist we bolted it together on its side with the i-beam slightly raised, and then we lifted it up with a Skid-Steer from the center of the i-beam and tipped it onto the legs.

SolidWorks concept showing the Hoist Bolted Together on its Side Before Lifting

SolidWorks concept showing the Hoist Bolted Together on its Side Before Lifting

We used the Skid-Steer to raise the Hoist to its 12.5 foot Height the first time …

A Happy Bill & Worker with the Hoist Set at 12.5 Feet Measured from the Bottom of the i-beam

A Happy Bill & Worker with the Hoist Set at 12.5 Feet Measured from the Bottom of the i-beam

Once the Hoist was up, I double checked the ‘real-life’ hoist measurements and then welded the Hydraulic Ram ( Quick-Connect ) brackets … The next morning mounted the brackets onto the hoist so it can be raised and lowered by one person … Easier with two people, but I did it by myself the first time

Inexpensive Hand-Pump Hydraulic Rams to Lower & Raise the Hoist's i-beam

Inexpensive Hand-Pump Hydraulic Rams to Lower & Raise the Hoist’s i-beam

The Hydraulic Ram brackets are Quick-Connect using only 1 bolt but they don’t have to be removed when the hoist is in its normal 9 foot position because the 20″ ram stroke allows the i-beam to be lowered to its lowest point

Hoist in its Normal 9 Foot Under the i-beam Position

Hoist in its Normal 9 Foot Under the i-beam Position

The Rams were on the Hoist for about 10 minutes before it was being used to lift Helical Piers and Drilling Pipe onto Bill’s trailer by his workers …

Some of the Worker's Loading Drill Pipe & Helical Piers onto trailer with Hoist

Some of the Worker’s Loading Drill Pipe & Helical Piers onto trailer with Hoist

I uploaded the Hoist’s SolidWorks CAD files to GrabCAD.com

https://grabcad.com/library/gantry-crane-hoist-1

SolidWorks CAD Files can be Found on GrabCAD.com

SolidWorks CAD Files can be Found on GrabCAD.com

That’s All …

~ CHEERS !!

.  .  .

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3 Comments

Filed under CONCEPTS, PROJECTS, WORKSHOP

3 responses to “Adjustable Height Gantry Hoist

  1. Adam Green

    Well Done!

  2. Pingback: Porta-Band-Saw Tabletop Stand | CTM Projects

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