Trailer Platform Levelers

SolidWorks Rendering of the Platform Trailer Front Levelers

SolidWorks Rendering of the Platform Trailer Front Levelers

One of the modifications made to the shop trailer was to add Front Levelers …

Click Here to view more about the  Workshop Trailer Platform

Screen-Capture of Modified Trailer into a Shop Work Platform

Screen-Capture of Modified Trailer into a Shop Work Platform

The threaded levelers allow the trailer to be a stable work platform in my shop.

Modified Trailer being used as a Work Platform for Engine

Modified Trailer being used as a Work Platform for Engine

In addition ( for more free space in the shop ) the front yoke towing unit can be removed creating ( approximately )  a 4 foot by 4 foot low workshop platform which can be rolled around to different areas in the shop using a 3rd wheel.

Click Here to see more information about the Modified 3rd Wheel

Cutting a Welding Gap Bevel on the Steel 1" Nuts

Cutting a Welding Gap Bevel on the Steel 1″ Nuts

The first step was to use the metal lathe to cut a welding bevel in the 1″ nuts …

Used the raw (non-coated) steel nuts found on the Phoenix Metal Scrounge

Parts to Create the Trailer's Front Levelers

Parts to Create the Trailer’s Front Levelers

Next cleaned the paint & rust off the old leveling tubes to prep for welding …

Also found 2 scrap pieces of left-over center round steel slugs from a previous project that were created when drilling large holes in metal with a hole saw …

Scrap Center Plugs of Metal Left-Over from Drilling Metal with Hole Saw

Scrap Center Plugs of Metal Left-Over from Drilling Metal with Hole Saw

The reason I cut the existing 1″ nuts off the old levelers was because they were not welded on as straight as I would like and had rusted over time.  I wanted them to thread easier so cut off the old nuts & prepped the new 1″ nuts for welding.

Used a Long Length of All-Thread to Line Up the Nut for Welding

Used a Long Length of All-Thread to Line Up the Nut for Welding

Another reason for cutting the bevel in the 1″ nuts was to create a method to align the nuts using a long threaded 1″ rod on the inside of the tubing.

The beveled nut fit inside the tubing, and as the threaded rod was tightened using another nut on the other end, it perfectly aligned and held secure for welding.

View Showing the Nut Centered & Prepped to be Welded to Leveler Tube

View Showing the Nut Centered & Prepped to be Welded to Leveler Tube

Once the 1″ nuts were welded on, I then used a magnet to line up the end caps…

Used a Magnet to Hold the Metal End Cap Plug in Place for Welding

Used a Magnet to Hold the Metal End Cap Plug in Place for Welding

After the End Caps were welded, I then drilled out the 1/4″ diameter existing hole-saw hole to  5/16″ diameter to tap for 3/8″-16 TPI (Threads Per Inch)

I will put some Anti-Seize on two 3/8″ bolts and screw them into the end caps to keep rain water out; however, if needed I can use the threaded holes to attach brackets to lift the platform trailer from it’s 4 corners with my chain hoist.

Tapping the Leveler's Welded End Cap

Tapping the Leveler’s Welded End Cap

Used a ‘Ratcheting’ tap holder which make short work threading large holes!

Click Here for more information about the  Tap Ratcheting Wrench

Close-Up View of the Ratchet Style Tap Holding Tool

Close-Up View of the Ratchet Style Tap Holding Tool

Also welded 1″ nuts to the ends of two 10″ lengths of 1″ All-Thread to act as adjustable height leg foot pads … This time I will put lots of Anti-Seize on the threaded legs to prevent rust.

When the welding & tapping was done I painted the new Front Leveler parts.

The finished Platform Trailer Levelers Ready to be Assembled

The finished Platform Trailer Levelers Ready to be Assembled

Used a 1″ thread tap to correct any weld warp & clean out paint on threads.

Another set of parts ready to mount on the Workshop Trailer Platform

~ CHEERS!! …

.  .  .  .

 

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Filed under PROJECTS, SolidWorks CAD Rendering, WORKSHOP

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