Powder Coating Oven 3DP Parts

SolidWorks Rendering of the Powder Coating Oven Electronics Box

Earlier this year I started buying parts to make a Powder Coating Oven.

Controls inside the finished PCO Control Box prior to wiring

Controls inside the finished PCO Control Box prior to wiring

I will try to post images later to help others make their own PCO controller …

Controls Shown in PCO Control Box Prior to Wiring

The goal is to have a Portable Powder Coating Oven (PCO) with removable panels that can be configured into different shapes to allow for powder coating rectangular boxy shaped items as-well-as long thin items by heating the same volume of air with 2 heating elements. ( Total of 5170 watts )

Powder Coating Oven on Wheels allowing to to be moved anywhere in shop

Also a portable (Plug-in) PID Controller for the Powder Coating Oven … with the bonus that the PID Controller can also be used with my Beer Home Brewing Equipment and a future outdoor Meat Smoking Hut 🙂

Portable Powder Coating Oven PID Temperature Control Unit

For this Project my plan was to first draw in all the purchased parts and then start designing the rest of the items using SolidWorks CAD Software.

CLICK HERE to Learn more about Powder Coating

Powder Coating Oven Parts drawn into SolidWorks

Powder Coating Oven Parts drawn into SolidWorks

Attempted to order as many parts as possible off of AMAZON.com

Dayton 1TDV2 High Temperature Blower, 115 Volt, 129 CFM

Dayton 1TDV2 High Temperature Blower, 115 Volt, 129 CFM

As they arrived, I weighed the parts and drew them into SolidWorks …

Measuring a part's weight with a digital scale

Measuring a part’s weight with a digital scale

SolidWorks allows me to make the CAD part’s weight, and center of gravity, the same as the real-world part, so completed Assemblies are the correct weight.

The weight of the actual real-world part matches the SolidWorks CAD part

The weight of the actual real-world part matches the SolidWorks CAD part

SolidWorks also allows users to make Photo-Realistic renderings of the parts for presenting a visual of how real-life item will appear when finished.

SolidWorks Renderings of Parts for the Powder Coating Oven

SolidWorks Renderings of Parts for the Powder Coating Oven

I decided to 3D-Print many of the parts for the Oven’s Control Box …

3D-Printed Side Air Hole Vent Covers for Electronics Box

3D-Printed Side Air Hole Vent Covers for Electronics Box

First designed the Powder Coating Oven’s Electronics box with SolidWorks …

( Click on any image to see a larger view of the photo )

SolidWorks CAD Rendering showing the side Vent Covers

SolidWorks CAD Rendering showing the side Vent Covers

One of the benefits of using a 3D-Printer is designing any shape needed without worry of ‘draft angles’ which are required to make plastic injection parts.

For example, I wanted to be able to switch out different size/models of square shaped PID Controllers & Digital Timers.

Rounds Cutouts in Sheet Metal to Mount Square Controls

Rounds Cutouts in Sheet Metal to Mount Square Controls

So I designed and 3D-Printed a mounting setup which allows ‘square’ controls to go in a ’round’ hole easily drilled with a 2.5″ hole saw using a drill press.

Mounts to put a Square PID Control into a Round Hole

Mounts to put a Square PID Control into a Round Hole

Also designed and drew up some Cord Stop Clamps  ( .STL Files )

3DP Cord Stop Clamps to Keep Cords from Pulling Out of the Control Box

3DP Cord Stop Clamps to Keep Cords from Pulling Out of the Control Box

I like to show lots to dimensions in my drawings to prevent mistakes 🙂

Drawing of the Powder Coating Oven’s Front Control Panel

Tested the 3D-Printed parts, and the purchased parts, within the sheet metal cutouts prior to welding & painting the Electronics Box.

Testing 3D-Printed Parts in the Sheet Metal prior to painting

Testing 3D-Printed Parts in the Sheet Metal prior to painting

The electrical Terminal blocks I bought didn’t work, so I designed some …

Uploaded the 3Dp .STL files to GrabCAD ~ Link:  3Dp Terminal Blocks

SolidWorks Transparent View of the Electrical Connection Terminal Block

SolidWorks Transparent View of the Electrical Connection Terminal Block

Didn’t have 1/8″ thick Copper so found some Aluminum angle in scrap bin …

Drill and Tap Size Dimensions for creating the Terminal metal bar

Drill and Tap Size Dimensions for creating the Terminal metal bar

Drilled and Tapped the Aluminum and then cut it to the correct size …

Tapping Threads in the No.6-32 and No.10-24 Connection Holes

Tapping Threads in the No.6-32 and No.10-24 Connection Holes

3D-Printed one for White wires, and another for Black wires, and the ABS 3D-Printing material acts as an insulator for the 120V electrical connections.

Aluminum or Copper Flatbar sections press into a slot in the ABS Terminal Block

Aluminum or Copper Flatbar sections press into a slot in the ABS Terminal Block

The Cover keeps the screws from falling out even if they become loose …

Different Size Wire Terminal Ring Connections can be used on Terminal Bar

Different Size Wire Terminal Ring Connections can be used on Terminal Bar

I will probably switch out the Aluminum with Copper flatbar when I get some.

3D-Printed ABS material Cover protects the metal area of the connections

3D-Printed ABS material Cover protects the metal area of the connections

A specific feature I wanted for this (PCO) Powder Coating Oven was the ablity to know the cost of the electricity used while Powder Coating parts.

Amp Volt Watt Multi-Meter purchased from AMAZON.com

bayite Amp Volt Watt Multi-Meter purchased from AMAZON.com

The multi-meter comes with a ring which needs to go around the L2 electrical wire to know the Amps being used, so I designed and 3D-Printed a stand.

3D-Printed Amp Meter Ring Stand fits inside Electronics Box

3D-Printed Amp Meter Ring Stand fits inside Electronics Box

Below is a SolidWorks rendering showing the wiring and Amp Ring Stand.

SolidWorks Rendering showing how the L2 White wire fits into Ring Stand

SolidWorks Rendering showing how the L2 White wire fits into Ring Stand

The baylite Multi-Meter shows the Voltage, Current, Power, and Energy.

SolidWorks Rendering of the kWh Meter for Powder Coating Oven electrical cost

SolidWorks Rendering of the kWh Meter for Powder Coating Oven electrical cost

3D-Printed ABS material provides protection from other wiring in the box …

The finished 3D-Printed Amp Meter Ring Stand Mount for Powder Coating Oven

The finished 3D-Printed Amp Meter Ring Stand Mount for Powder Coating Oven

Tested each of the parts prior to mounting the in the electronics box ~ In the photo below I have the baylite meter setup to test 120v amperage; however, the meter is wired to 240V power in the Powder Coating Oven control box.

Testing the kWh Amp Meter unit prior to installing the the Electronics Box

Testing the kWh Amp Meter unit prior to installing the the Electronics Box

In future posts, after fully testing out the Powder Coating Oven, I will show the wiring in SolidWorks, which is easier to view than the real-life wiring because I will be able to hide, or make transparent, other items in the box to show specific wires going to specific items.

SolidWorks Transparent View of Powder Coating Oven Control's Wiring

SolidWorks Transparent View of Powder Coating Oven Control’s Wiring

I have already uploaded many of the CAD parts to GrabCAD.com

https://grabcad.com/charles.metaldesigner/projects

SolidWorks Rendering of Switches used in the Powder Coating Oven designs

SolidWorks Rendering of Switches used in the Powder Coating Oven designs

Tried to keep most of the items as Single part files; yet, still allow the parts to be adjustable, such as allowing switches to be viewed as ON or OFF.

The SolidWorks CAD switch can be set to show it as ON or OFF

The SolidWorks CAD switch can be set to show it as ON or OFF

Made the gap adjustable so the switch fits on other material thicknesses …

Gap of the Switch can be changes to match the thickness of metal

Gap of the Switch can be changes to match the thickness of metal

The LED Readout numbers can also be set for Tutorials & User Manuals …

The AUBER PID Controller keeps the the Oven's temperature consistent

The AUBER PID Controller keeps the the Oven’s temperature consistent

I try to use metal from my scrap metal bin to make equipment for my shop and sometimes the metal is heavier than I would normally use.

For example, the sheet metal for this PCO (Powder Coating Oven) Control box is 0.135″ thick and I would probably normally use 0.075″ thick sheet metal.

Welding the Powder Coating Oven Control Box Sides Together

Welding the Powder Coating Oven Control Box Sides Together

After drilling & cutting all the holes, I welded the Control box sides together …

The finished sheet metal PCO (Powder Coating Oven) Control Box

The finished sheet metal PCO (Powder Coating Oven) Control Box

Since this unit is for my shop I painted the PCO Control box Flat Black …

The PCO Control Box with Bolt-On Top & Back Plates

The PCO Control Box with Bolt-On Top & Back Plates

The Top & Back plates bolt-on to make the inner Controls easier to wire …

Painted the Powder Coating Oven (PCO) Control Box Flat Black

Painted the Powder Coating Oven (PCO) Control Box Flat Black

After the paint cured I started adding the controls & switches …

Installed the the Front LED Lights, Switches, Timer, and PID Controller

Installed the the Front LED Lights, Switches, Timer, and PID Controller

Noticed I was one ON/OFF switch short … They came in a Pack of 5 … *sigh*

Back on AMAZON to order more … For some reason I thought there was 6 🤔

All the Powder Coating Oven electronic parts fit in the box as designed

All the Powder Coating Oven electronic parts fit in the box as designed

After tests realized I didn’t need the Air Cooling fan but added one anyway.

Next Step is to add the 240V Outlets to each side of the PCO Control Box

Next Step is to add the 240V Outlets to each side of the PCO Control Box

Everything on the PCO is powered from outlets & extension cords, because this is a portable Powder Coating Unit that can be taken to different locations.

This Electronics box can also control a Meat Smoker & a Home Brewing system.
(  I wanted a multi-use Control Box for future projects ~ Whoo Hoo!!  )  😜

Front Blue LED lights-Up when the Blower Fan 120V outlet is switched ON.
Front Green LED Lights-Up when Oven Light 120V outlet is switched ON.

Fan Side View of the Powder Coating Oven's Control Box

Fan Side View of the Powder Coating Oven’s Control Box

The Amber Light on the front lets users know 240V power is plugged into the Control box … When dealing with 240 Volts – Safety, Safety, Safety!! ⚡

In addition,  the Amber LEDs on each side of the control box light-up when the Contactor Switch is providing 240V power to the 240V side outlets that are connected to the Powder Coating Oven’s Heating Elements.

Vent Side View of the Powder Coating Oven's Control Box

Vent Side View of the Powder Coating Oven’s Control Box

The White LED Lights-Up when 120V Power is plugged into the Control box.

I’m having ‘Laser Etched’ Metal Labels made up to explain Control functions.

View showing the 120V Outlets for the PCO's Blower Fan & Oven Light

View showing the 120V Outlets for the PCO’s Blower Fan & Oven Light

Additional Views of the Controls for the Powder Coating Oven …

Top-View Powder Coating Oven Control Box

Top-View Powder Coating Oven Control Box

Fan Side-View Powder Coating Oven Control Box

Fan Side-View Powder Coating Oven Control Box

 

Vent Side-View Powder Coating Oven Control Box

Vent Side-View Powder Coating Oven Control Box

 

There is a Switch to Turn ON/OFF the Air Cooling Side Fan

There is a Switch to Turn ON/OFF the Air Cooling Side Fan

 

3D-Printed Side Air Vents fit into 2.5" Holes cut with a Hole Saw

3D-Printed Side Air Vents fit into 2.5″ Holes cut with a Hole Saw

That’s All for Now 😜

Emergency Stop added to the front of the PCO Control Box

Emergency Stop added to the front of the PCO Control Box

I found the eStop button and added it to the PCO Control Box design …

SolidWorks Photo-Realistic CAD Rendering showing the Emergency Stop

SolidWorks Photo-Realistic CAD Rendering showing the Emergency Stop

Made a temporary stand/mount for the PCO Electronics Control Box …

I think PCO Stand/Mount sort of looks like a Robotic Kangaroo Rat

I think PCO Stand/Mount sort of looks like a Robotic Kangaroo Rat

Already has the nickname of ‘Roo-Rat’  😜

Click on image to see a larger view of PCO Controller on Stand/Mount

Click on image to see a larger view of PCO Controller on Stand/Mount

I uploaded my SolidWorks ‘Working CAD Files’ to GrabCAD for anyone that would like to see how I tested the wiring.

The wiring in the model is not complete, but it will show how I wired the Auber PID Temperature Control, as-well-as the Inkbird Timer Control and the Digital Amp/Volt Meter.

GrabCAD Link: https://grabcad.com/library/powder-coating-oven-wiring-1

Prototype Wiring CAD Model Files Uploaded to GrabCAD.com

The Powder Coating Over Controls I used were:

Auber SYL-2342  PID Temperature Control
( SYL-2342 version is for Contactors not SSRs )

INKBIRD IDT-E2RH  Timer

Eaton C25BNF240A  Compact Definite Purpose Contactor

Bayite AC 80-260V LCD  Watt Multimeter Ammeter Voltmeter

AC Infinity AXIAL 8038   Muffin Cooling Fan, 115V AC

Erb44t10010  2,585 watt Heating Elements ( 2 )

If you have any wiring/control Questions send me a comment  🙂

… CHEERS!!!

.    .    .    .

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3 Comments

Filed under 3D-Printing, BRAINSTORMING, CONCEPTS, HOMEBREWING, PROJECTS, SolidWorks CAD Rendering, WORKSHOP

3 responses to “Powder Coating Oven 3DP Parts

  1. Will

    Hey bro!

    I’ve been looking at this post for the last few months (well, since you posted it lol) and wanted to know when you’d be able to post the wiring post? Currently looking for my composites oven build and your controller is everything I want!

    Thanks!

    • Perfect timing Will … I had some other projects to finish over past few months and just finished so was thinking I would work on some Website posts this weekend… The controller works GREAT!!!! I’ll send you and email and we can discuss which items you would like to see prior to me making the website posts and I can send you those photos directly. CHEERS!!

  2. Marc Pfeuti

    Impressive work! I built and wired my oven with no issue. I’m using an Auber 2342 same contactor setup but am struggling with the programming. Maybe I’ve had a stroke but it was ridiculously easy calculating air recirculation, volume, power consumption based off measured resistance etc. The programming instructions I have need to be translated to normal English. Process value and set value, hysterisis settings. Percentage of operation figures? I get this to some degree but I just want to run the damn thing for powder coating.
    Any suggestions for a useful interpretation or do I just sit down and translate the instructions?
    As far as wiring it was very easy. I’d be glad to share that with anyone.

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